melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
melannen ([personal profile] melannen) wrote2017-07-25 07:11 pm
Entry tags:

FMK #18: Writers of Color

Last week's F win was a tie between The Dragon and the George and Goblin Quest. I am waffling over which one to pick. Goblin Quest had discussion in the comments, but on the other hand, reading it would break my unbroken streak of not having read any of the many Hines novels I own.

K winner was the Callahan. I am going to keep Callahan's Crosstime Saloon but this may be the nudge I needed to just drop the rest.


Anyway, this week's FMK theme is SF by Anglophone Writers of Color. We will pretend the reason it was tough to get a set of ten together for this is that when I get one of these it doesn't linger as long on the to-read pile. (Actually, it was tougher than I expected because finding out race for a lot of SF writers - especially older and more obscure ones - is not simple. There does not seem to be an easily accessible and accurate masterlist of SF Writers of Color out there. And at some point, for some of then, I found myself thinking that if they aren't interested in making their ancestry part of their public bio, I need to not be looking this hard. I never did figure out if Philip Jose Farmer is actually in any way Hispanic.)

How FMK works, short version: I am trying to clear out my unreads. So there is a poll, in which you get to pick F, M, or K. F means I should spend a night of wild passion with the book ASAP, and then decide whether to keep it or not. M means I should continue to commit to a long-term relationship of sharing my bedroom with it. K means it should go away immediately. Anyone can vote, you don't have to actually know anything about the books.

I pick a winner on Friday night (although won't actually close the poll, people can still vote,) and report results/ post the new poll on the following Tuesday, and write a response to the F winner sometime in the next week.

Link to long version of explanation (on first poll)


Poll #18611 FMK #18: SF Writers of Color
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 39


Parable of the Sower by Octavia Butler (1993)

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F
16 (43.2%)

M
20 (54.1%)

K
1 (2.7%)

The Fall of the Towers by Samuel R. Delany (1970)

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F
16 (59.3%)

M
9 (33.3%)

K
2 (7.4%)

The House of Dies Drear by Virginia Hamilton (1968)

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F
14 (66.7%)

M
6 (28.6%)

K
1 (4.8%)

Moses, Man of the Mountain by Zora Neale Hurston (1939)

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F
11 (55.0%)

M
8 (40.0%)

K
1 (5.0%)

Helen and Troy's Epic Road Quest by A. Lee Martinez (2013)

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F
13 (65.0%)

M
5 (25.0%)

K
2 (10.0%)

The Tempest Tales by Walter Mosley (2008)

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F
8 (50.0%)

M
5 (31.2%)

K
3 (18.8%)

Border, Breed nor Birth by Mack Reynolds (1972)

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F
7 (43.8%)

M
4 (25.0%)

K
5 (31.2%)

Mirror Friend, Mirror Foe by George Takei (1979)

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F
19 (79.2%)

M
2 (8.3%)

K
3 (12.5%)

The 51st State by Nkosi White (2010)

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F
10 (66.7%)

M
4 (26.7%)

K
1 (6.7%)

Amped by Daniel H. Wilson (2012)

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F
7 (46.7%)

M
3 (20.0%)

K
5 (33.3%)


recessional: bare-footed person in jeans walks on log (Default)

[personal profile] recessional 2017-07-25 11:50 pm (UTC)(link)
I admit I just want you to read the road quest one so I can read the review. 😜
seekingferret: Word balloon says "So I said to the guy: you never read the book yet you go online and talk about it as if--" (Default)

[personal profile] seekingferret 2017-07-26 02:19 am (UTC)(link)
Dunno, I love Martinez's work and even for me after reading that one I kinda said "Maybe it's time for me to take a break from his work."
seekingferret: Word balloon says "So I said to the guy: you never read the book yet you go online and talk about it as if--" (Default)

[personal profile] seekingferret 2017-07-26 06:37 pm (UTC)(link)
My favorites are The Automatic Detective, A Nameless Witch, and Gil's All-Fright Diner. Helen and Troy has some decent set pieces but doesn't really hold together overall.
Edited (closed tag) 2017-07-26 18:37 (UTC)
stardreamer: Meez headshot (Default)

[personal profile] stardreamer 2017-07-26 12:50 am (UTC)(link)
Anything by Takei is worth it.

And after you read The Parable of the Sower, read this.
the_rck: (Default)

[personal profile] the_rck 2017-07-26 01:00 am (UTC)(link)
I know I've read The House of Dies Drear and Mirror Friend, Mirror Foe, but I could not for the life of me tell you anything else about either book. For Virginia Hamilton, I remember the Justice and Her Brothers trilogy much better than any of her other books.

I did not enjoy the one Martinez book that I tried, but I think that was more of a case of mismatch between reader and author than the book being bad. As I recall, it was humorous but not in a way that worked for me.

I hesitated over the Reynolds. I haven't read that one, but I read a different book of his that had a young woman talking about men trying to rape her and her having 'raped them right back.' That kind of flew over my head at the time, beyond me not being sure it made sense, but seems really, really icky in hindsight because I'm pretty sure it only really made sense from a 'if you're constantly open to sex, you can't be raped' angle. Looking at his Wikipedia page, that book was co-written with (finished after his death by?) Dean Ing, so I have no idea how typical it was.

I have not read Parable of the Sower because, when I got my hands on a copy, I was at a point in my life when I didn't feel I could face it. Since then, I've had trouble reading all but the fluffiest novels, and Butler's work is never, ever fluffy. I still voted M on that one because the other things of hers I've read were simply that good.
the_rck: (Default)

[personal profile] the_rck 2017-07-26 06:58 pm (UTC)(link)
The one picture I found doesn't look like he is, but that's not always a way to judge. The picture came up on the sidebar in a Google search of his name.

I think he might not have been-- Wikipedia says "After attending the U.S. Army Marine Officer’s Cadet School and the U.S. Marine Officer’s School, he joined the U.S. Army Transportation Corps in 1944..." The Marine Corps started segregated units for blacks in 1942 (also per Wikipedia), but those units had white officers. "...proceeded in stages from segregated battalions in 1942, to unified training in 1949, and finally full integration in 1960." Unless Reynolds was passing, he probably wasn't black.
muccamukk: Wanda of Many Colours (Marvel: Scarlet Witch)

[personal profile] muccamukk 2017-07-26 01:42 am (UTC)(link)
I was meh on Parable of the Sower on its own, but when read with Parable of the Talents, it's very good. Butler hacked off Sower because it was getting too long, and it's really about 1/3rd of a story. They are VERY violent.

I liked Fall of the Towers a lot. It's probably not as clever as it thinks it is (Delany was very young, and it was his first series), but it says some interesting things, and is very well written.
muccamukk: The silhouette of Sam as the Falcon cutting across other pictures of Sam. (Cap: Falcon)

[personal profile] muccamukk 2017-07-26 08:58 pm (UTC)(link)
Sower really just doesn't stand on its own. It's more or less background to the REAL story which is in Talents. I wish she'd lived to write the third, but the first two stand well. I just wanted more. UNRELENTINGLY GRIM for a while, then it relents a bit. Lot of sexual violence.

I have only read short stories, his memoirs (best description of what it felt like to be in a gay orgy goes to...), and this trilogy. I mean to get to other works.
blueswan: girl reading book (book reading)

[personal profile] blueswan 2017-07-26 12:00 pm (UTC)(link)
I'm not big on commitment so I don't often suggest M, but normally I would not hesitate to suggest M for Delaney or Butler. But this is some of Delaney's earliest fiction and I havent read this one by Butler, so today is not one of those times.
seekingferret: Word balloon says "So I said to the guy: you never read the book yet you go online and talk about it as if--" (Default)

[personal profile] seekingferret 2017-07-26 06:39 pm (UTC)(link)
Dhalgren was a lunch break book for me- I read a handful of pages every day for several months. It's not plotty enough that you'll need to know what happens next, and it's full of literary and SFnal pleasures, so it worked really well that way for me.