melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
melannen ([personal profile] melannen) wrote2017-08-08 06:31 pm
Entry tags:

FMK #20: Holmesiana

Last week's K winner was Hounded. I guess I do not get to read it and find out if the second-most-popular male UF lead gets sexually assaulted as often as Harry Dresden does. ;_;

The F winner was Truckers, which is good, since I went from thinking about urban fantasy tropes to reading old Marcone/Dresden fic to reading all the Vimes/Vetinari(/Sybil) fic to reading all the Watch books to working on that prompt about the First Sedoretu of Ankh-Morpork.

(Finally reading Snuff was what convinced that that okay, Vimes could manage to be married to Margolotta, they have many things in common and also he can see in the dark now and she and Sybil as pen pals is canon, so.)

...which also explains why I still don't have any more reviews for you, oops.

But! We have made it to FMK #20! Which means another non-SF option! This week: Holmesiania.

How FMK works, short version: I am trying to clear out my unreads. So there is a poll, in which you get to pick F, M, or K. F means I should spend a night of wild passion with the book ASAP, and then decide whether to keep it or not. M means I should continue to commit to a long-term relationship of sharing my bedroom with it. K means it should go away immediately. Anyone can vote, you don't have to actually know anything about the books.

I pick a winner on Friday night (although won't actually close the poll, people can still vote,) and report results/ post the new poll on the following Tuesday, and write a response to the F winner sometime in the next week.

Link to long version of explanation (on first poll)


Poll #18671 FMK #20: Holmesiana
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 31


The Final Solution: A Story of Detection by Michael Chabon (2004)

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F
6 (46.2%)

M
6 (46.2%)

K
1 (7.7%)

Good Night, Mr. Holmes by Carole Nelson Douglas (1990)

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F
9 (81.8%)

M
0 (0.0%)

K
2 (18.2%)

Sherlock Holmes vs. Dracula : or, The Adventure of the Sanguinary Count by Loren D. Estleman (1978)

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F
6 (54.5%)

M
0 (0.0%)

K
5 (45.5%)

The Return of Moriarty by John Gardner (1974)

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F
3 (37.5%)

M
3 (37.5%)

K
2 (25.0%)

Sherlock Holmes and the Giant Rat of Sumatra by Paul D. Gilbert (2010)

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F
5 (62.5%)

M
1 (12.5%)

K
2 (25.0%)

Exit Sherlock Holmes: The Great Detective's Final Days by Robert Lee Hall (1977)

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F
3 (37.5%)

M
2 (25.0%)

K
3 (37.5%)

The Beekeeper's Apprentice by Laurie R. King (1994)

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F
16 (61.5%)

M
8 (30.8%)

K
2 (7.7%)

The Empress of India: A Professor Moriarty novel by Michael Kurland (2006)

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F
4 (44.4%)

M
2 (22.2%)

K
3 (33.3%)

Extraordinary Adventures of Arsene Lupin, Gentleman-Burglar by Maurice LeBlanc (1907)

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F
10 (66.7%)

M
3 (20.0%)

K
2 (13.3%)

The Seven Per-Cent Solution by Nicholas Meyer (1974)

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F
8 (42.1%)

M
9 (47.4%)

K
2 (10.5%)

The Boy Sherlock Holmes: Death in the Air by Shane Peacock (2008)

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F
3 (37.5%)

M
1 (12.5%)

K
4 (50.0%)

The Lost Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes by Denis O. Smith (2014)

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F
3 (33.3%)

M
2 (22.2%)

K
4 (44.4%)

The Case of the Missing Marquess: An Enola Holmes Mystery by Nancy Springer (2006)

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F
7 (63.6%)

M
3 (27.3%)

K
1 (9.1%)

Fer-De-Lance by Rex Stout (1934)

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F
8 (57.1%)

M
4 (28.6%)

K
2 (14.3%)

Sherlock Holmes and the Ghosts of Bly: And Other New Adventures by Donald Thomas (2010)

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F
2 (22.2%)

M
2 (22.2%)

K
5 (55.6%)

In The Shadow of Sherlock Homes: Classic Edwardian and Victorian Detective Stories edited by Leslie S. Klinger (2011)

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F
7 (63.6%)

M
4 (36.4%)

K
0 (0.0%)

Sherlock Holmes through Time And Space edited by Isaac Asimov (1984)

View Answers

F
14 (82.4%)

M
2 (11.8%)

K
1 (5.9%)


the_rck: (Default)

[personal profile] the_rck 2017-08-08 10:48 pm (UTC)(link)
I reacted very differently to the Enola Holmes books as the mother of a teenage girl than I did before I had a child. I think that the things I found as barriers to enjoyment are features that increase enjoyment for younger readers. Enola really is competent to deal with whatever comes her way, but I keep thinking of all of the girls in a similar situation to hers who had no resources.

I haven't read any of Kurland's mysteries, but I have an abiding attachment to one of his SF book-- The Princes of Earth-- so I'm deeply curious as to what someone reading this particular book might think. The other SF by him that I tried tended to fall into the WTH was he smoking? category.

People tend to either love or hate The Beekeeper's Apprentice. The determining factor tends to be willingness to tolerate OC POV characters who are tending toward perfection. I enjoyed it and several of the sequels. I'm not sure if something changed about the books or if something changed about me, but I hit a point where I just couldn't get into the books any more. (It being me is possible because it's about the time that I stopped being able to read many other things.)
espresso_addict: Espresso cup with steam on white background with text 'Coffee' (coffee (white))

[personal profile] espresso_addict 2017-08-08 11:51 pm (UTC)(link)
The 'romance' on Holmes' side is a bit blink and you'll miss it; if you can stomach the Mary-Sue aspects of the heroine, it's not that squicky.
rachelmanija: (Default)

[personal profile] rachelmanija 2017-08-08 10:49 pm (UTC)(link)
I think this is your first poll where I have read none of them.
flemmings: (Default)

[personal profile] flemmings 2017-08-09 02:04 am (UTC)(link)
If a Holmes fangirl passing by and seeing 'Holmesiana' may give her opinions-

The Seven Per-Cent Solution is absolutely the best Holmes pastiche I've read, bar, maybe, Ronald Knox and Adrian Conan Doyle's own efforts.

Sherlock Holmes and the Ghosts of Bly I found uninspired and dull.

The Lost Chronicles of Sherlock Holmes contains historical howlers and typos galore, that made reading it actually painful.

I found The Beekeeper's Apprentice much easier to take than the later books because IIRC (and I may be mistaken) the romance doesn't start until the next book. I didn't like the erasing of Watson later on, but the first book gave a convincing scenario of how Holmes might have found Mary a congenial soul.

Good Night, Mr Holmes is readable fluff. That's not the Irene Adler I recall.

I haven't read Sherlock Holmes vs Dracula, but did read the author's Dr Jekyll and Mr Holmes, which added nothing to the Stevenson book. Foregone conclusion, basically. This one might be different, but Estleman's pastiche style sounds off to my ears.
sheliak: Tik-Tok from the Oz books, reading a book. (reading)

[personal profile] sheliak 2017-08-09 04:37 am (UTC)(link)
I enjoyed The Beekeeper's Apprentice and a couple of the early sequels, but gradually lost interest after the relationship between Holmes and the main OC turned romantic. (For the record, that happens in the second book, and very suddenly; as a kid I missed any hints that existed in this book, or in O Jerusalem, the other one set pre-romance. Although I did guess that it was coming, based on part of the framing device.)

I'm almost certain that I've read Fer-De-Lance; "almost" because the various Nero Wolfe books tend to blur together in my mind. I'm very fond of the characters and the series, but very few individual entries made an impression. Google tells me that it's the first book, and I remember being told that the first few books are not especially strong compared to some of the later stuff, but I can't back that up for myself because, as I said, very few of them stick out in my mind and this doesn't seem to be one of them.

I haven't actually read (or in most cases heard of) the rest of the books in the poll, and don't feel qualified to vote on their fates.
the_rck: (Default)

[personal profile] the_rck 2017-08-10 02:10 am (UTC)(link)
Nero Wolfe canon specifically has him coming from Montenegro. For whatever that's worth. As I recall, there's not a lot of detail, but there are references to people he knew from there, some now in New York and some not, and to freedom fighting of some sort. At one point, an adopted daughter turns up bringing a revelation about a once upon a time marriage that our narrator knew nothing about.

I don't think there's anything in canon to say he couldn't be the son of one of those characters, but I'm pretty sure that Rex Stout didn't intend it.

I think that Stout took a few books to solidify Wolfe's personality quirks and the supporting cast. I read a lot of Nero Wolfe books in high school because my mother owned a lot of them and because they're all really short. Archie Goodwin is a very early example of the smartass first person narrator who's kind of laughing at everyone.

I had kind of wondered how Fer-de-Lance came to be on this list. I figured it was just that it was a consulting detective mystery and that it wasn't likely to fit so well on other lists.
jesse_the_k: Text: "backbutton > wank"  over left arrow icon with label "true story." (Back better than wank)

[personal profile] jesse_the_k 2017-08-10 04:58 pm (UTC)(link)
Chabon's is great--better than his original novels, off which I have bounced, everyone of them, even though I should love them, given the weird and the Jewish and the comics.
lastscorpion: Basil Rathbone & Nigel Bruce (Holmes & Watson Rathbone & Bruce)

[personal profile] lastscorpion 2017-08-12 02:17 am (UTC)(link)
Fer de Lance is awesome! And the later ones get better, too! I've read all of those that I could find at least 3 or 4 times apiece.