melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
melannen ([personal profile] melannen) wrote2017-03-21 03:57 pm
Entry tags:

FMK #5: MEN who are MEN

FMK #4's F winner was "The Princess and the Goblin" by George MacDonald, at a v. reasonable ~200 pages, and I will be reading it tonight.

K was "The Pilgrim's Progress". I wanted to be good, I really did, but I opened it up just to see what it was like, and, like, two paragraphs in I realize this is the book that taught the world that Heaven is full of pretty girls in white dresses with golden harps, and also notice that some previous owner has hand-annotated my copy, and, look, I can't. But I did move it from the fiction shelf to the Penguin Classics shelf where it can keep company with its boring and elderly brethren, does that count?

I am realizing that the nature of the votes here is that we are going to disproportionately vote out timeless classics that people have Opinions on while all the ones that are just Bad and Boring stick around forever. Feel free to vote K just because you know nothing about it and don't know why anyone would own it!

How FMK works, short version: I am trying to clear out my unreads. So there is a poll, in which you get to pick F, M, or K. F means I should spend a night of wild passion with the book ASAP, and then decide whether to keep it or not. M means I should continue to commit to a long-term relationship of sharing my bedroom with it. K means it should go away immediately. Anyone can vote, you don't have to actually know anything about the books.

I pick a winner on Friday night (although won't actually close the poll, people can still vote,) and report results/ post the new poll on the following Tuesday, and write a response to the F winner sometime in the next week.

Link to long version of explanation (on first poll)

Anyway, enough with courtesans and princesses and all that girly stuff. Today we are going to vote on MEN who are MEN.

erratum: "The Clockwise Man" is actually 2005, copy-paste error, oops. All the other 1976 ones are actually 1976.
Poll #18103 FMK 5: MEN who are MEN
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 43


The Bicentennial Man by Isaac Asimov (1976)

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F
14 (36.8%)

M
7 (18.4%)

K
17 (44.7%)

The Clockwise Man (Dr. Who New Series Adventures) by Justin Richards (1976)

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F
5 (18.5%)

M
4 (14.8%)

K
18 (66.7%)

The Demolished Man by Alfred Bester (1953) (1976)

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F
16 (53.3%)

M
7 (23.3%)

K
7 (23.3%)

The Duplicated Man by James Blish (1953)

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F
10 (37.0%)

M
2 (7.4%)

K
15 (55.6%)

The Female Man by Joanna Russ (1975)

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F
20 (54.1%)

M
16 (43.2%)

K
1 (2.7%)

The Invisible Man by H. G. Wells (1897)

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F
13 (37.1%)

M
9 (25.7%)

K
13 (37.1%)

The Iron Man by Robert E. Howard (1930)

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F
7 (22.6%)

M
2 (6.5%)

K
22 (71.0%)

The Man From U.N.C.L.E. by Michael Avallone (1965)

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F
15 (55.6%)

M
1 (3.7%)

K
11 (40.7%)

The Multiple Man by Ben Bova (1976)

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F
3 (11.5%)

M
1 (3.8%)

K
22 (84.6%)

The Simultaneous Man by Ralph Blum (1971)

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F
3 (13.0%)

M
1 (4.3%)

K
19 (82.6%)

The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl by Shannon Hale (2017)

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F
18 (50.0%)

M
18 (50.0%)



(I also once owned copies of The Man Who Folded Himself and The Boy Who Reversed Himself but it looks like they have been dispersed away. ):

[personal profile] plinythemammaler 2017-03-23 08:41 am (UTC)(link)
The pilgrims progress was like my favourite book as a child and teenager! I clearly have to reread it as an adult omg, I remember it as non stop thrilling adventure!!! .....the funniest thing about this us the last battle really hacked me off at the same age