melannen: Commander Valentine of Alpha Squad Seven, a red-haired female Nick Fury in space, smoking contemplatively (Default)
melannen ([personal profile] melannen) wrote2017-03-14 08:42 pm
Entry tags:

FMK #4: Pre-Golden-Age SF

Okay, so FMK is going to be Tuesdays now. :P I forgot that on normal Mondays, a little distraction is good, but on busy Mondays I basically don't have time to sit down at the computer from Saturday evening until Monday evening, and that doesn't work so well. (and today was a snow day so I spent it sewing, it was excellent.)

Anyway, FMK #3 K winner was Tarnsman of Gor and the F winner was Kushiel's Dart. I, uh, haven't finished Kushiel's Dart. I'm 500 pages in! If it was a reasonably-sized novel, that would be done twice over! Anyway short version: I am enjoying it a lot although not ravishingly in love, have already recommended it to a friend who actively enjoys brick-sized books full of court intrigue, and keep getting Cassiel the Angel of Bromance mixed up with SPN's Castiel the Angel of... *ahem* "Bromance". I will post a fuller response either later this week or when I am finished, depending on which comes first.

I also started reading Tarnsman of Gor I know! I am breaking my own rules already! But I want to be able to make fun of it fairly, okay? And it's like, 20% the length of Kushiel. I did put the other two Gor books I inexplicably owned on the dump-unread pile, though?

This week's FMK theme: English-language SF written before 1930! here is where we find out who is voting entirely based on gendered author names

How FMK works: I am trying to clear out my unreads. So there is a poll, in which you get to pick F, M, or K. F means I should spend a night of wild passion with the book ASAP, and then decide whether to keep it or not. M means I should continue to commit to a long-term relationship of sharing my bedroom with it. K means it should go away immediately. Anyone can vote, you don't have to actually know anything about the books.

I pick a winner on Friday night (although won't actually close the poll, people can still vote,) and report results/ post the new poll on the following Sunday Monday Tuesday.

Link to long version of explanation (on first poll)


Poll #18088 FMK #4: English-language SF written before 1930
Open to: Registered Users, detailed results viewable to: All, participants: 51


The Bowl of Baal by Robert Ames Bennet (1917)

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F
10 (58.8%)

M
1 (5.9%)

K
6 (35.3%)

The Pilgrim's Progress by John Bunyan (1678)

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F
13 (38.2%)

M
7 (20.6%)

K
14 (41.2%)

Pellucidar by Edgar Rice Burroughs (1923)

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F
9 (42.9%)

M
3 (14.3%)

K
9 (42.9%)

The Worm Oroborous by E. R. Eddison (1922)

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F
12 (52.2%)

M
7 (30.4%)

K
4 (17.4%)

A Voyage to Arcturus by David Lindsay (1920)

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F
9 (52.9%)

M
3 (17.6%)

K
5 (29.4%)

The Princess and the Goblin by George MacDonald (1872)

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F
21 (63.6%)

M
11 (33.3%)

K
1 (3.0%)

Ship of Ishtar by A. Merritt (1924)

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F
10 (62.5%)

M
3 (18.8%)

K
3 (18.8%)

Armageddon 2419 A.D.: The Seminal "Buck Rogers" Novel by Philip Francis Nowlan (1928)

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F
9 (52.9%)

M
1 (5.9%)

K
7 (41.2%)

The Vampyre by John Polidori (1818)

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F
13 (54.2%)

M
7 (29.2%)

K
4 (16.7%)

Frankenstein by Mary Wollstonecraft Shelley (1818)

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F
13 (28.9%)

M
30 (66.7%)

K
2 (4.4%)

The Skylark of Space by E. E. "Doc" Smith (1928)

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F
18 (72.0%)

M
4 (16.0%)

K
3 (12.0%)

Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift (1726)

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F
13 (31.0%)

M
24 (57.1%)

K
5 (11.9%)

Roverandom by J. R. R. Tolkien (1925)

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F
13 (56.5%)

M
5 (21.7%)

K
5 (21.7%)

The Castle of Otranto by Horace Walpole (1764)

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F
17 (60.7%)

M
3 (10.7%)

K
8 (28.6%)

The War of the Worlds by H. G. Wells (1898)

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F
19 (52.8%)

M
12 (33.3%)

K
5 (13.9%)

The Picture of Dorian Gray by Oscar Wilde (1891)

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F
18 (43.9%)

M
18 (43.9%)

K
5 (12.2%)

Orlando by Virginia Woolf (1928)

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F
18 (50.0%)

M
17 (47.2%)

K
1 (2.8%)

rushthatspeaks: (sparklepony only wants to read)

[personal profile] rushthatspeaks 2017-03-15 03:47 am (UTC)(link)
I love many of these books passionately, including The Worm Ouroboros (I once saw E.R. Eddison's handwriting! it looked exactly like runes, only in English!) and Voyage to Arcturus and The Princess and the Goblin and I grew up reading E.E. "Doc" Smith and imprinted forever.

But I clicked F on Ship of Ishtar because it is the kind of screamingly-batshit pulp they just do not make 'em like anymore. The copy I read had a completely incoherent and gaudy cover which turns out to be not only literal but downplaying the scene, which is not one of the stranger scenes in the book. I can't remember how it does on racism and sexism; I was too busy boggling. Merritt is generally bad at race and time-period-decent-to-middling on gender. If you ever come across it, I highly recommend his masterpiece, Seven Footprints to Satan, which is one of the most sheerly entertaining books I know. But Ship of Ishtar is pretty boss.
katherine: A line of books on a shelf, in greens and browns (books)

[personal profile] katherine 2017-03-15 06:07 am (UTC)(link)
That is... quite the cover.